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Mama’s Limoncello 2012/09/16

Posted by Mummy Ruth in Cooking, fun, hacks, Tips and Tricks.
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I have been making bottles of Limoncello as Christmas gifts!

Prep Time: 5 mins.,
Cooking Time: 10 mins.,
Serves: 2.

Equipment:

  • vegetable peeler;
  • small sharp knife;
  • bowl or jug;
  • bottles;
  • Cling film

Shopping List:

  • ten unwaxed lemons;
  • 75ml bottle of vodka;
  • 3 1/2 cups Water;
  • 2 1/2 cups Sugar.

 

To Make the Limoncello:
The peel is all we need for this recipe, so using the vegetable peeler, get long strips of peel from the lemons. Trim & discard the white pith from the peel using the knife.

Put the de-pithed peel strips into the jug and pour in the vodka before covering with cling film.  Leave alone for four days at room temperature.

Four Days later

Remove cling film and stir, pour into a large saucepan and heat on stove (medium heat) until sugar dissolves (about 5 mins) then let it all cool down to room temperature again.

Cooking Up Confusion 2010/12/14

Posted by Mummy Ruth in baking, Cooking, Musings.
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Yogurt aisle in Sainsbury'sI quite often look up recipes on the internet, but this brings in problems — not just translating between measurements, but also translating what things are called.  To be honest, this drives me crazy at times, and to make matters worse, some of the US American terms can actually be found in supermarkets over here!  For example, I can buy “Baking Soda” right from the shelf, yet it is a North American term for Bicarb!  I have seen Bistro menus in Glasgow using “Zucchini” instead of “Courgette”.  All the British and European supermarkets have signs above the aisles for “Yogurt“, only the American-owned ASDA uses the American spelling, “Yoghurt”. Yet it seems that “Yoghurt” (with the ‘h’) is proper English!

Yogurt aisle in TescoI guess if we were French, we would receive specially translated software, movies, novels and recipes.  The trouble with being British is that we just get the untranslated straight American stuff, and this makes us think we know what we’re talking about when we don’t always — I didn’t know they called Yorkshire Puddings “Pop-overs” until recently, and I have heard of “Scallions” for ages without knowing that this is simply syboes!  So I have decided here to put a table of terms in the hope that it might help someone sometime! (more…)